"
image

“Consider that you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are traveling at 220 km/sec across the galaxy. 90% of the cells in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not “you.” The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star. Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato.

The existence of the rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; to animals without cones, the rainbow does not exist. So you don’t just look at a rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colors you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum.” “"

We Originated in the Belly of a Star, NASA Lunar Science Institute, 2012. (Illustration: Christy Scherrer)

(Update: the link does not work but you can find it here: http://sservi.nasa.gov/articles/beware-of-images/)

(Source: amiquote)


QUOTE
Mar 12
7:09 pm
1,890 notes

lalalana13:

lalalana13:

brunettelaidbare:

I love living in LA

Wow, gorgeous.

*whimper, sniff sniff I miss her * :(

(Source: , via horrorsandcunnilingus)


PHOTOSET
Feb 22
6:01 am
2,681 notes

"I would look up at the sky and ask that I be a reflection of all that I saw in nature, so that when people looked at me, they would see the fields and the wild flowers and the depth of sky in my eyes."

The beautiful Rosemary Gladstar.  (via thegreatkosmickitchen)

(Source: thegreatkosmickitchen, via treee-magic)


QUOTE
Feb 20
3:09 am
1,196 notes
gentlewave:

Zhou Chunya (周春芽): Peach Blossom series - flower blooms, flower fades, year after year, (2009)

gentlewave:

Zhou Chunya (周春芽): Peach Blossom series - flower blooms, flower fades, year after year, (2009)

(via killer-titz)


PHOTO
Feb 20
3:08 am
3,299 notes

(Source: caterwauled, via killer-titz)


PHOTO
Feb 20
2:33 am
42,804 notes

"I believed that I wanted to be a poet, but deep down I wanted to be a poem."

Jaime Gil de Biedma

as quoted by Enrique Vila-Matas in Bartleby & Co., trans. Jonathan Dunne (via proustitute)

QUOTE
Feb 7
11:43 pm
4,605 notes

"My father had taught me to be nice first, because you can always be mean later, but once you’ve been mean to someone, they won’t believe the nice anymore. So be nice, be nice, until it’s time to stop being nice, then destroy them."

Laurell K. Hamilton  (via pomeray)

(Source: makelovetothemoon, via pomeray-deactivated20140809)


QUOTE
Feb 7
10:05 pm
547,529 notes

PHOTO
Feb 7
4:06 pm
27 notes

PHOTOSET
Feb 7
3:46 pm
110,607 notes
friendlyatheist:

Dream garden. Some day, some day. #koi

friendlyatheist:

Dream garden. Some day, some day. #koi


PHOTO
Feb 7
3:44 pm
32 notes
friendlyatheist:

They have also a synonym for it. Religion.
Source

friendlyatheist:

They have also a synonym for it. Religion.

Source


PHOTO
Feb 7
3:43 pm
125 notes
pantadora:

il mio piccolo mondo

pantadora:

il mio piccolo mondo

(Source: pinterest.com, via cat-arzyna)


PHOTO
Feb 7
3:06 pm
734 notes

(Source: 2o6, via eva-and-the-demons)


PHOTO
Feb 7
2:41 pm
289,266 notes

PHOTO
Feb 7
2:37 pm
16,157 notes
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Fast Gas Bullet from Cosmic Blast N49 Scattered debris from supernova explosion N49 lights up the sky in this gorgeous composited image based on data from the Chandra and Hubble Space Telescopes. Glowing visible filaments, shown in yellow, and X-ray hot gas, shown in blue, span about 30 light-years in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. Light from the original exploding star reached Earth thousands of years ago, but N49 also marks the location of another energetic outburst — an extremely intense blast of gamma-rays detected by satellites on March 5th 1979. The source of the March 5th Event is now attributed to a magnetar - a highly magnetized, spinning neutron star also born in the ancient stellar explosion which created supernova remnant N49. The magnetar, visible near the top of the image, hurtles through the supernova debris cloud at over 70 thousand kilometers per hour. The blue blob on the far right, however, might have been expelled asymmetrically just as a massive star was exploding. If so, it now appears to be moving over 7 million kilometers per hour.
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/S. Park et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/UIUC/Y. H. Chu & R. Williams et al.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Fast Gas Bullet from Cosmic Blast N49
Scattered debris from supernova explosion N49 lights up the sky in this gorgeous composited image based on data from the Chandra and Hubble Space Telescopes. Glowing visible filaments, shown in yellow, and X-ray hot gas, shown in blue, span about 30 light-years in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. Light from the original exploding star reached Earth thousands of years ago, but N49 also marks the location of another energetic outburst — an extremely intense blast of gamma-rays detected by satellites on March 5th 1979. The source of the March 5th Event is now attributed to a magnetar - a highly magnetized, spinning neutron star also born in the ancient stellar explosion which created supernova remnant N49. The magnetar, visible near the top of the image, hurtles through the supernova debris cloud at over 70 thousand kilometers per hour. The blue blob on the far right, however, might have been expelled asymmetrically just as a massive star was exploding. If so, it now appears to be moving over 7 million kilometers per hour.

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/S. Park et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/UIUC/Y. H. Chu & R. Williams et al.


PHOTO
Feb 7
2:31 pm
67 notes